Monthly Archives: September 2016

Bathrooms Ideas

Celebrities grab our attention because of their extravagant clothes, complicated relationships and, most notably, their stunning homes. The size of their houses and celebrity lifestyles they live are pretty remarkable.

Although most of us will never experience this lavish way of life, it’s fun to see where our favorite celebs spend their time and learn about their taste in interior design. Join me as I take you inside the bathrooms of five of the most admired celebrities of our time.

 

Sarah Jessica Parker

We all know her as the star of Sex and the City and love her for it. Sarah Jessica Parker is no stranger to the camera and celebrity scene. According to Variety, the actress and husband Matthew Broderick recently purchased two side-by-side townhouses on a prime, tree-lined block in the heart of New York City’s wildly pricey West Village, for $35 million.

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick’s two Manhattan townhouses both feature classic brick façades and bathrooms any woman would want to own. One of their bathrooms features a large white tub with nearby floating wood shelves and a newly installed shower with glass doors.

 

Adele

Her voice is incredible and her home is gorgeous. The next celebrity palace we’ll be entering belongs to no other than the legendary, Adele. The singer shattered sales records when she released her third album, 25, so it’s not surprising she recently made a home upgrade. Adele reportedly used some of that cash to scoop up this Beverly Hills spectacle for $9.5 million.

Kitchen and bathrooms that you should know

Your kitchen and bathroom are two rooms in the home that get used most often. Guests and family alike will frequent these areas, so it’s important you have them looking their best, regardless of their size.

Whether your old bathroom or kitchen needs a quick update to refresh the look, or you’re planning a complete remodel, you’ll want to see what’s trending in 2017 before you begin.

 

Kitchen Trends

As the heart of the home, a kitchen is an area that should be welcoming and functional. If you have an outdated kitchen, you may be considering a kitchen remodel this year. While it has larger costs upfront, it can have a great impact on the ROI for your home. The average cost to remodel a kitchen is $18,727, with most homeowners spending between $12,986 and $21,306. Materials tend to be the costliest items when it comes to a kitchen remodel.

However, if you’re just looking to make a few changes, there are plenty of DIY options to update your kitchen quickly. Whatever you decide, be sure your kitchen incorporates a few 2017 kitchen trends.

 

Black & White

If you’re looking for a kitchen color trend that will stick around, black and white is your answer. This clean and timeless style is impacting kitchens this year in a big way. White walls and cabinetry with black hardware are perfect ways to get this look. The best news about this trend is its versatility. As kitchen décor trends change, you can easily incorporate the look.

Your Older Home a Safe Home

Homes built today must adhere to strict safety codes. Older homes, while offering plenty of charm and character, are more likely to have safety issues — potential problems can range from lead paint and asbestos to faulty wiring and wobbly stairs.

But you can make an older home a safe home. Educate yourself about some of the dangers associated with old homes and take any necessary action to transform your older house into one that’s as safe as possible.

The Dangers of Lead Paint and Asbestos in Older Homes

Certain materials used to build and remodel older homes are no longer used today because of safety concerns associated with them. These materials include:

  • Asbestos.Asbestos was used in insulation, shingling, millboard, textured paints, and floor tiles in older homes to make them resistant to fire. But when asbestos becomes airborne, it can be inhaled and can accumulate in your lungs, potentially leading to lung cancer, mesothelioma, and fatal scarring of the lungs. Since asbestos-containing materials are usually not dangerous when they are in good condition, it is usually best to leave these materials alone. But if you’re planning on remodeling your home and removing them, you will need to contact local environmental health officials to find out how to have these materials properly removed and, equally important, properly disposed of. If you aren’t sure if you have asbestos-containing materials in your home, a professional asbestos inspector can do an assessment and advise you.
  • Lead paint.Lead-based paint was once commonly used to paint homes, but health professionals now know that airborne lead can lead to serious health problems, such as damage to the brain, nervous system, blood cells, and kidneys. Exposure to high levels of lead can cause convulsions, coma, and even death. If your home was built prior to 1960, there is a good chance it contains lead paint. Like asbestos-containing materials, surfaces with lead-based paint are usually not dangerous if they are in good condition. But lead paint that is chipping or disturbed by friction or remodeling can cause lead poisoning. You can hire a professional who has been trained in dealing with lead paint problems to test your home and help you remove it or make your home safer. If you have children and you suspect your home contains lead-based paint, have them tested for lead exposure.

If you are considering purchasing an older home, you should first determine if asbestos or lead is a problem, especially if you are planning on renovating or restoring the home. Always make sure qualified professionals inspect the house and determine the extent of the problem.

Fire Safety Hazards in Older Homes

Another potential problem that can keep an older home from being a safe home is an outdated electrical system. While older electrical systems had no problems supplying enough power in previous years, many have trouble keeping up with today’s increased power demands. This can result in electrical fires — in fact, electrical fires are three times more likely to happen in homes that are more than 40 years old compared to homes that are only 11 to 20 years old.

Alarms Can Save Lives

By the time flames are roaring through a house, it may be too late to stop the fire. Even worse, it may be too late to safely get your family out of your burning home. Fires can start and spread quickly, often while you’re asleep. So to protect yourself and your family from fires, install a smoke alarm in every crucial area of your home.

Buying a Smoke Alarm

A smoke alarm, also called a smoke detector, can sense a fire early on and warn a family of impending danger before tragedy strikes.

Smoke alarms are sold at hardware and home improvement stores, and even some supermarkets. You might even be able to get a free smoke alarm from your local fire department.

You can buy a smoke alarm that runs only on battery power or one that is wired into the electrical system of your house and runs on electricity with a battery backup. Above all, each smoke alarm you buy must carry the UL (Underwriters Laboratories) label on it.

There are three types of smoke alarms on the market:

  • Ionization smoke alarm. This alarm detects big, open flames.
  • Photoelectric smoke alarm. This alarm detects a smoky fire that’s smoldering, before any big flames get started.
  • Dual sensor smoke alarm. This is a combination smoke alarm that detects both types of fires.

You should have both an ionization and a photoelectric smoke alarm, or a dual sensor smoke alarm. And, remember, you will need smoke alarms at multiple sites throughout your home.

Installing a Smoke Alarm

A smoke alarm tucked in a far corner of your home might not detect smoke from the opposite end of the house until it’s too late. So it’s important to install a smoke alarm on each floor of your home — don’t forget your basement — and at strategic areas on each level if you have a lot of square footage. Install a smoke detector near sleeping areas, even inside the bedroom of any household member who is difficult to arouse from sleep, and put another one in your kitchen. Install them high up on walls, near the ceiling, since smoke will rise quickly.